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❶Augustus, especially, seemed built around "intelligence" and "quirkiness" to the point that he didn't feel real; he felt like a caricature of a "philosophical teen".

by John Green

Paper Towns Summary & Study Guide Description
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Of course, Quentin discovers this on May 28, so he and his friends skip their high school graduation to race at breakneck speed to Agloe, a "paper town" that doesn't exist on any map.

It was created by mapmakers as a plagiarism detection tool. Someone built a general store in the general vicinity of Agloe, and Margo Roth Spiegelman has been living there. When Quentin finds her, she tells him that she never wanted to be found, and she doesn't want to go home.

She's going to find a new home and try to figure out who she really is. Quentin realizes that he's idolized and been in L-U-V with a girl he doesn't really know—and now that he does know her, he has to let her go. Intro Summary Prologue Part 1: A dead body is decomposing… Oh, gross. Parents need to know that as with Green's other books, this one contains some edgy material: Two kids come across the dead body of a man who killed himself, and later Q.

Also, the very appealing main characters sneak out at night and conduct a series of pranks, involving vandalism and misdemeanors, for which there are no consequences other than a fond and amusing memory. But the characters -- and the writing -- are very sophisticated. Readers will find references to Moby Dick , Leaves of Grass -- and be asked to think critically about identity and how well we ever really know anyone.

Add your rating See all 22 parent reviews. Add your rating See all 80 kid reviews. Quentin lives next door to Margo, the amazing, vibrant, wickedly sophisticated teen goddess of his town, with whom he has been in love since they were in elementary school. But in high school she has mostly ignored him. A few weeks before graduation, she shows up at his window, leading him on a night-long series of payback pranks, after which she disappears.

Worried that she may have committed suicide, Quentin obsessively pursues clues he thinks she has left him, involving Woody Guthrie, Walt Whitman, and nonexistent towns that are either failed developments or mapmakers' copyright traps.

Margo is AWOL for much of the book, and Quentin is obsessively trying to figure out what happened to her -- so it's his supportive friends who provide the reader with the humor and pure joie de vivre that makes the book fun as well as thoughtful. Quentin's two best friends are characters in both meanings of the word: Both are band geeks; Ben is obsessed with prom, thrilled to have a date, and likes to think of himself as retro-cool he refers to girls as "honeybunnies," and Quentin is unable to convince him that it's not cool, it's just dorky.

Radar is a fanatical editor of a Wikipedia-like site, and his parents have the world's second-largest collection of black Santas. Together with Quentin, they're a pretty sweet group of teens, and readers will enjoy their journey -- and conversations. Families can talk about edgy coming-of-age stories. Does the language or other mature content in this book seem realistic? Is there anything that is -- or should be -- off limits when it comes to books marketed to teens? John Green's characters often go on road trips.

What other road trip books or movies can you think of? Why are road trips so often a part of coming-of-age stories? Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate. Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support. Our ratings are based on child development best practices.

We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential. Learn how we rate. For Your Family Log in Sign me up. Reviews Find the good stuff, faster — from books to YouTube. I really liked the character of Radar, Q's other best friend who is more intellectual and into posting on a site meant to be a parody of Wikipedia.

In the second half of the book, we get to know Lacey, a former popular person and enemy of the three boys who befriends them and helps in the quest to find Margo. She was a character who I grew to like gradually, but by the end of the book I could see how necessary she was to solving the mystery. Throughout most of the book, Margo is more of an idea than a character. Everybody has different memories of her, and so sees her differently. Q's idea of Margo evolves through the story, and her character becomes steadily more complex.

Even when we discover the real Margo, she is still one of the most complicated characters in YA. Paper Towns was one of the funniest books I have come across in ages. There is ongoing snarky wit in the first two parts, mainly coming through Q's reactions to the strange things Margo seems to have done. A lot of comic relief also comes through Ben, particularly when he is drunk. Despite this, in my opinion, the funniest part of the book was the road trip towards the end.

I won't spoil it, but it is crazily random and had me actually laughing out loud. Not only this, but the book almost has its own language of inside jokes: Black Santas, catfish and beer swords are all involved. If I had to find a criticism for this book a hard feat , I would say the plot starts to drag slightly in the middle. There is a period where the clues all slow down a bit, and the humour is lost.

That said, it picks up again with a major discovery. The ending of this book will break your heart. It's sad, but it feels right given the rest of the story. Everything is pulled together.

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Paper Towns by John Green tells the story of Quentin, otherwise known as Q. Q and his next door neighbor Margo used to be best friends and, as they’ve grown up and become high school seniors, they have turned into acquaintances/5(K).

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Paper Towns has , ratings and 45, reviews. Jamie said: I need to start off with my criticism of John Green:1) Margo and Quentin are exactly the /5.

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Paper Towns is truly an unforgettable book that is easily the best of the best. With no doubt I am sure it is the best book of and one /5(). Paper Towns debuted at #5 on the New York Times bestseller list and won the Edgar Award for Best Young Adult Mystery. It is taught in many high school and college curricular, often in conjunction with Whitman’s Leaves .

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Sep 17,  · Edgy, compelling teen angst mystery. Read Common Sense Media's Paper Towns review, age rating, and parents guide.4/4. Paper Towns is a fantastic, interesting and unique novel that I thoroughly enjoyed. I was very eager to read this following how much I loved An Abundance of Katherines, and I decided that I had to.